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  The LEEFS Fellows
Kat Allen

Research
My research involves oceanography and climate change. I'm interested in the ocean because it plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, and is closely linked to Earth's climate. Right now I am developing new ways to investigate the ocean-atmosphere relationship in the past, because this will help us understand our present environment and may even give insight into future changes. Unfortunately, we can't travel back in time ourselves, so instead we study ancient shells that have accumulated as sediments on the seafloor. These shells contain a record of the environmental conditions in which they grew. To better understand and quantify the relationship between planktic (surface-water) shell chemistry and seawater, I collect live organisms and grow them under different controlled conditions. In this way, I'm a kind of marine detective: unlocking the coded relationship between sediments and seawater, trying to figure out what the ocean was like in the past.

LEEFS Motivation
This is both a learning and a teaching opportunity for me. I want to improve my ability to communicate scientific ideas and to foster critical thinking in students, because these skills are important to me. I'm working really hard to understand the Earth system, and want to be able to share information clearly with others and also to get young people excited about environmental studies. I have been fortunate enough to have some really fantastic advisors and role models during my education, and I want to pass on some of that insight and passion for learning. I'm also aware that my current studies and research are ultimately taxpayer-funded, so I think it's important to complete the circle, and give back my knowledge and energy to the community.

Collaboration Description
I will be working with Susan Vincent at the Young Women's Leadership School in East Harlem. We are planning to collaborate both in the classroom and in field studies out at the Piermont Marsh, where Susan has been conducting some exciting research projects with her students during the past few years.


Contact:
katallen@ldeo.columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Earth and Environmental Science

Collaboration:
2010-2011: Susan Vincent
The Young Women’s Leadership School of East Harlem

Links:
Personal Website

Michelle Brown

Research
I study how animal behavior is affected by changes in environmental conditions. For my dissertation, I’m studying group-living monkeys in the forests of East Africa and am looking at the factors that cause groups of monkeys to fight. For instance, do groups fight to protect access to their most important food sources, or do they fight to protect something else? Who participates in the fights (males and/or females)? To study these issues, I observe groups during naturally-occurring fights, conduct non-invasive experiments, and record information about their habitat.

LEEFS Motivation
If someone had asked me fifteen years ago whether I would become a scientist, the answer would have been no. I wasn’t confident in my math or science classes and simply didn’t realize that I could make a career out of studying animal behavior. All that changed when I had the opportunity – beginning in 8th grade – to work with a research scientist. Had I only been exposed to science in the classroom, I’ve no doubt that I would have ended up in some other profession; but being able to work with a scientist on ‘real’ research questions led me to realize that the necessary math and science skills were both attainable and interesting. I’m hoping that I can pass on that realization to kids at MS88.

Collaboration Description
Thus far my collaboration with Isabel Azcona at MS88 has centered largely on the theme of “everything relates to monkeys.” Most kids like monkeys, so I figure if I can take the principles and skills that kids are supposed to learn in their science classes and show how I use them in my day-to-day work with primates, those principles and skills will be just a little more interesting and relevant to the students.


Contact:
mb2425@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology

Collaboration:
2009-2011: Isabel Azcona
Middle School 88, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NY

Links:
Personal Website

Georgina Cullman

Research
My research focuses on better understanding small-scale (human) community relations with conservation projects in the developing world. I use ethnographic methods and remote sensing to understand how communities affect and understand their landscapes and how this complements or conflicts with biodiversity conservation goals in northeastern Madagascar.

LEEFS Motivation
As a New Yorker, an important motivation for me in participating in LEEFS was to “give back” to my beloved city. Also, I love teaching at the undergraduate level and was interested in learning how to teach at the middle school level. Finally, I hoped that the challenge of explaining scientific concepts to middle schoolers would enhance my ability to present my research to broader audiences.


Contact:
gc237@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology

Collaboration:
2008-2009: Autumn Eckenrod
2008-2009: Rebecca Utton
Middle School 88, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NY

Nadine Els

Research
My research is on air-sea interactions and geochemical cycling. Specifically, I focus on the transfer of gases, such as carbon dioxide and oxygen, through water bodies. I look at the chemical and physical conditions, such as wind, rain or bubbles, that can lead to enhanced fluxes across the interface.

LEEFS Motivation
I was drawn to the LEEFS program because of the particularly underwhelming experiences I had in science education at the secondary level. I think experiential learning can be an extremely useful tool for teaching scientific concepts in a manner that is both engaging and thought provoking. Hands-on, field-based approaches to understanding the scientific method can be more effective at fostering student interest and involvement than other techniques. The LEEFS program helps to solidify connections from the science classroom to the outside world and promote academic interest in related fields.

Collaboration Description
This is the second year of my collaboration with Susan Vincent at TYWLS. I have been involved with senior marine science, after-school research projects, and sophomore earth science. We have been able to directly incorporate concepts from my research into the marine science curriculum, as well as some of the science fair projects. I have also been able to accompany the students on a number of field-based excursions including, trout stripping at the Cold Springs Fish Hatchery, DEC's 'Day in the life of the Hudson River' and reoccurring sampling in the Piermont Marsh, a NERRS tidal salt marsh on the Hudson River. Susan and I also traveled to Louisiana and Florida with a small group of students to study invasive and endangered fish species with Loyola, NO University wetlands ecologists.


Contact:
bnh2103@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering

Collaboration:
2008-2010: Susan Vincent
The Young Women’s Leadership School of East Harlem

Adriana Garriga-Lopez

Research
In my research, I am concerned with the intersection of state formations and colonial techniques of power, alongside the medicalization of social identities. My dissertation ("Viral Citizens: Contagion, Corporeality, and HIV/AIDS in Colonial Puerto Rico," in progress) focuses on HIV/AIDS as a political preoccupation in Puerto Rico; local and diasporic histories of social justice activism around HIV/AIDS; and contemporary debates over competing notions of citizenship, sovereignty, and self-determination.

LEEFS Motivation
I see teaching as the means to facilitate the development of critical, analytical thought and writing skills, in such a way as to make anthropological concerns relevant to my students' lives, and to the social conditions that draw their attention and scholarly interest. LEEFS has made me a better teacher by exposing me to New York City public school students and classrooms, and by partnering me with socially-committed science teachers. LEEFS provides an avenue for the integration of qualitative research methods and the tools of cultural anthropology into the environmental and natural science curriculum, and for engaging high-needs students in that process. I am motivated by the opportunity to engage urban youth on issues of social justice, representation, and transformation.

Collaboration Description
During my first year with LEEFS, I was partnered with Isabel Azcona at MS 88 in Brooklyn, where I worked with seventh and eighth-grade students. This year, I am partnered with Samantha Adams at the Heritage School in Spanish Harlem. In both of these appointments, I have participated in the classroom and worked alongside the teachers to integrate ideas about ethnographic research and different models of scientific research. I have also conducted basic AIDS education among students and teachers at MS 88, The School for Global Leaders, The Heritage School, and The Young Women's Leadership School of East Harlem. My focus in this program is on bringing to the fore questions about the relationship between science and subjectivity (or subjective knowledges,) and on the relationship between environmental science, ecology, and the health of marginalized people.


Contact:
amg2009@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Anthropology

Collaboration:
2008-2009: Isabel Azcona
Middle School 88, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NY
2009-2010: Samantha Adams
The Heritage School

Jeffrey Lancaster

Research
My current research is at the intersection between photochemistry (using light to make chemistry happen), polymer chemistry (e.g. plastics), and surface chemistry. I am working to develop methods to attach and pattern molecules to any polymer surface without the need for generating a new procedure for each new surface.

LEEFS Motivation
I have long been interested in teaching and in the communication of science, and the LEEFS program has given me the chance to expand my communication skills while hopefully piquing the interests of the next generation of scientists. Though I plan to teach at the university level, I think it is important for my development as a scientist and educator to see firsthand the way science is taught to youth, to engage youth in discussions about science, and to share with them what it means to be a scientist.

Collaboration Description
This is my second year collaborating with Cristi Lagos at Middle School 88. Together we plan weekly inquiry-based activities, extensions of the required content to include 'real science', and explanations and demonstrations of my work as a chemist. My time with the students often is centered around their questions and their curiosity, and we hope to foster an environment where students are able to question and investigate the world around them.


Contact:
jrl2132@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Chemistry

Collaboration:
2008-2009: Cullen Naumoff
2008-2009: Isabel Azcona
2008-2010: Cristi Lagos
Middle School 88, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NY

Links:
Research Group Website

David McGee

Research
I work to understand past climate changes using geochemical tools. This research involves using ocean sediments, lake sediments and cave deposits as archives of Earth's climate. My research primarily focuses on reconstructing past precipitation levels and winds in the world's drylands by tracking the amount of dust blown out of these regions, changes in lake levels, and the geochemistry of cave deposits.

LEEFS Motivation
As a former secondary school science teacher and now a science graduate student, I'm interested in understanding ways to make connections between university science departments and K-12 schools. The LEEFS program provided a great opportunity to explore one model of university-K-12 interaction.

Collaboration Description
My work has focused working with Dan Rouillard to bring real-world, local data into his 10th-12th grade Urban Ecology class. Two highlights of the year for me were 1) seeing students work out creative compromises in an activity in which they represented different stakeholders in Columbia's Manhattanville expansion and 2) learning about how to help students explore complicated data sets in a project using epidemiological data from NYC.


Contact:
dmcgee@ldeo.columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Collaboration:
2008-2009: Daniel Rouillard
High School for Arts, Imagination and Inquiry, Manhattan, New York

Links:
Research Website

Meghan McGinty

Research
Although we understand that there is a correlation between land tenure, tree ownership, tree sapling suppliers, ethnobotanical knowledge and how farmers manage shade agroforestry systems, these relationships are very dynamic and merit further clarification. Research that explores the various facets of resource rights and tree seedling sources and how they shape the agroforestry systems that depend on native forest tree diversity can provide insight into the processes of native tree management and foster conservation of native tree management. If we are to rely on agricultural practices as tools for the conservation of biological diversity, we need to better understand the drivers of practices that favor the conservation of native forest tree management in agroforestry. To this end, my research examines agroforestry practices in a fragmented landscape of high conservation value, the Coastal Atlantic Forest Corridor (CCMA) in Bahia, Brazil.

LEEFS Motivation
Since I became a scientist and more specifically, a botanist, I have found it very rewarding to get other people, adults and children alike, excited about science and nature. I am passionate and enthusiastic about what I have researched and enjoy passing along my curiosity. Working with children is an exceptional opportunity to inspire the next generation to work with science and nature, increasing the professionals in the field. Additionally, after 5 years of research with farmers and tropical agroforestry, I have become convinced of the importance of communication and education. The LEEFS opportunity allows me to improve my abilities as a professional to communicate and convey the importance of the natural sciences.

Collaboration Description
Coming Soon!


Contact:
mmm2196@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology

Collaboration:
2010-2011: Annie Blomberg
2010-2011: Lauren Brooks
Dual Language Middle School

Links:
Personal Website

Andrew Mugler

Research
My research focuses on the application of mathematical modeling to small biological networks. For example, many genes produce proteins whose function is to regulate the protein production of other genes. Taken together, these interactions form a genetic network within which the control mechanisms are contained for cell-level decision making, as in embryonic development, nutrient intake, etc. I use mathematical and computational techniques to quantitatively probe the properties of such networks, such as their information-processing ability, their functional versatility, and their capacity to evolve.

LEEFS Motivation
I had been teaching science and math for several years at the undergraduate and advanced high school levels. I noticed that my most rewarding teaching experiences were those in which I brought aspects of science or math to students for whom it was a new or unexpected exposure. Moreover, these experiences required me to explain scientific concepts at a fundamental level which, often surprisingly, sharpened my own understanding of the subjects. The LEEFS program presented an opportunity for me to extend this type of teaching to a broader community of students. It was also the first program I had seen that offered an opportunity to fuse public school curriculum with current research in a feasible way.

Collaboration Description
I work with Michael Seymour, a seventh grade math teacher at Middle School 88 in Brooklyn, NY. Together we devise ways in which current microbiology research can be incorporated into the classroom in the language of the math curriculum. For example, students estimate the size of a colony of bacteria in two ways: using exponents (by watching a time-lapse movie of dividing bacteria and counting the doubling events) and using the area of a circle (by measuring the diameter of an actual colony on a petri dish and diving by the area of one bacterium). We focus on hands-on activities that excite the students while reinforcing the concepts they are responsible for learning.


Contact:
ajm2127@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Physics

Collaboration:
2008-2010: Michael Seymour
Middle School 88, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NY

Links:
Research Website
Collaboration Website

Philip Orton

Research
I study physical oceanography and also ocean-atmosphere interactions. My dissertation research project is on the Hudson River estuary, where I have been studying physical forcing of carbon dioxide exchanges between the atmosphere and the water — about 1/3 of human emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel burning has ended up in the ocean, and we are interested in understanding how this works better.

LEEFS Motivation
My initial interests in the program were to become more involved with the people of New York City, which I love, and to learn to integrate my research with teaching.

Collaboration Description
My yearlong highlight was taking students out of the classroom and setting up ongoing water quality and physics measurements set up in the Harlem River, which will be sent by bluetooth directly to the classroom starting this summer. Because of my effort to focus on this tidal strait behind the school, there seems to be a lot of momentum toward building a dock for future educational activities. Coincidentally, the city and community groups are moving to extend the greenway that circles Manhattan past this location, which will add to this momentum.


Contact:
orton@ldeo.columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Earth and Environmental Science

Collaboration:
2008-2009: Mauricio Gonzalez
Federick Douglass Academy

Links:
Personal Website

Ellane Park

Research
My research projects span over various subfields of photo-, nano-, polymer, and surface chemistry. One of the projects attempts to tackle the problem of icing on the wings of aircraft vehicles. By photografting functionalized nanoparticles to a surface, we are able to add roughness and hydrophobic chemistry to the surface. We hope to prevent icing on plane wings by creating a superhydrophobic surface.

LEEFS Motivation
LEEFS fellowship offers a unique opportunity to work with the NYC public schools engaging students in science. It is an exciting opportunity to teach chemistry and inspire high school students to think of innovative ideas that can help them connect the learned classroom concepts to the recent science and technology that they use everyday.

Collaboration Description
My collaboration with Harbor High School in Bushwick, Brooklyn involves a once-a-week commitment to co-teach chemistry laboratory experiments. Eventually, our goal is to translate the chemistry of my Ph.D. research to the classroom setting so that the students can learn the breadth and depth of chemistry and its real world applications.


Contact:
ejp2109@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Chemistry

Collaboration:
2009-2011: Sarah Gribbin
2010: Michael Moshos
Harbor High School

Links:
Research Group Website

Elizabeth Pierce

Research
I work in the fields of paleoclimate and geochemistry, and am particularly interested in further exploring the history of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. While we know that the ice sheet formed approximately 34 million years ago, with a major growth to near present-day size about 14 million years ago, we still need to learn more. Given the projected increase in temperature due to global warming, it is important to develop a better understanding of how an ice sheet that currently holds the equivalent of 52 meters of sea-level rise reacted to past changes in climate. Specifically, I am interested in characterizing sediments carried by icebergs in order to trace them back to their sources as a means of studying past changes in ice-sheet behavior; for the past two years I have been working on characterizing the source areas of ice rafted detritus around the perimeter of East Antarctica by looking at glacially derived sediments in marine sediment cores.

LEEFS Motivation
I wanted to become a LEEFS fellow for two main reasons: first, because I enjoy working with younger students and introducing them to the Earth Sciences and second, so that I could learn from both the students and the teacher that I am paired with how to be a better educator and public speaker when it comes to my field and my research. I want to be involved in education and outreach as I continue in my career, and have enjoyed my experiences with both thus far. The LEEFS program offers a more sustained experience in that, as a fellow, I will be interacting with the students once a week. I am very excited to be a fellow in this program, and am looking forward to the coming year!

Collaboration Description
Coming Soon!


Contact:
elp2116@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Earth and Environmental Science

Collaboration:
2010-2011: Michael Seymour
Middle School 88, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NY

Links:
Personal Website

Su-Jen Roberts

Research
I am a behavioral ecologist who studies animal social behavior, specifically focusing on the evolutionary implications of different reproductive strategies within a social system. My field site is in Kakamega Forest in western Kenya, where I observe blue monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis). Using molecular and behavioral techniques, I am working to determine paternal kinship and to characterize the reproductive success of males, thereby clarifying the role of different reproductive tactics in determining fitness.

LEEFS Motivation
The LEEFS program attracted me because it fosters a link between Columbia and the surrounding community, giving graduate students the opportunity to give something back to the city. I am excited about the prospect of getting young people more involved in hands-on research to help them to better understand and appreciate the natural world. I hope to help my students become engaged in creative scientific inquiry and acquire the knowledge and resources necessary to pursue their interests in the future.

Collaboration Description
I am just beginning my collaboration, so I will probably have more to say about this later!


Contact:
skr2127@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology

Collaboration:
2009-2010: Jonathan Goddard
Middle School 88, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NY

Paul Schmieder

Research
My research investigates the small scale mixing dynamics and transport mechanisms associated with estuaries. Many coastal waterways currently suffer from the effects of urbanization and industrialization in the form of polluted and contaminated water. To understand the impact of contamination, the hydrodynamics of these water bodies must be quantified. Through the use of deliberate tracers such as SF6 (sulfur hexafluoride), we can gain insight on how mixing is affected by water stratification, river geometry, and tides. We can also use our tracer technique to quantify advection, dispersion, gas exchange, and residence times for these water bodies.

LEEFS Motivation
What initially interested me in this program was having the opportunity to translate very technical science into a medium that is approachable by members of the community who are not classically trained in the sciences. I knew that having the opportunity to test my ability to translate and communicate the field of earth science would be a beneficial opportunity for me. I was also interested in this program because I saw the opportunity as a great tool to demonstrate that the higher-level sciences are approachable and useful to all.

Collaboration Description
Throughout the 2008-2009 school year I continued to work with Mike Moshos at the Harbor School in Brooklyn, assisting him with teaching and lab activities in the Earth Science Review classes. One of the highlights of the year was an excursion to the Museum of Natural History. During this trip I saw the students' excitement and interest in the Earth Sciences rise to a peak, and it was a moment where we were able to communicate a lot of information to the students and they absorbed it.


Contact:
schmied@ldeo.columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Collaboration:
2008-2009: Michael Moshos
The Harbor School, Brooklyn, New York

Links:
Research Website

Adrienne Smith

Research
My research focuses on processes that occur within and at the base of ice sheets. I am particularly interested in subglacial water as an amplifier of climate change. The presence of water in an ice sheet or glacier can increase ice flow velocities and thus change the rate of transportation of ice from the continent to the ocean. In order to understand the impact of global warming on human infrastructure, we need to quantify the role of water in our planet’s bodies of ice because changes in the ice control global sea level.

LEEFS Motivation
The LEEFS program appealed to be on both professional and personal levels. Professionally, I saw it as an opportunity to improve my communication skills. The general population learned most of what they know about science in high school. These students represent the audience for research web pages and research projects with political, economic or social implications. I expect the students at FDA will teach me about how non-scientists perceive science while I am teaching them how to think more scientifically. Personally, I saw it as a chance to contribute to ongoing efforts to broaden minority participation in the sciences. Many studies suggest that the small proportion of minorities that choose to go into the sciences is related to the small number of role models that are currently available in these fields. I have found science to be a challenging and rewarding choice with many more career options than the stereotype of working in a laboratory. Hopefully, sharing my experiences will encourage young people to explore their world in a scientific way!

Collaboration Description
The Frederick Douglass Academy is one of a few schools in the New York City Area that has a program dedicated to research experiences for high school students. As part of this program, students identify an area of interest, boil that down into a research question, design their research projects and independently collect and analyze data. My goals are to guide the process of finding a dynamic research question and to aid them in analysis and presentation of the research findings. I work primarily on the numerical side of the student research projects, helping students to understand and apply relevant statistics to their data.


Contact:
aes2150@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Collaboration:
2009-2010: Mauricio Gonzalez
Frederick Douglass Academy

Links:
Research Group Website

John Templeton

Research
My research is related to what geologists generally refer to as "crustal deformation," which means observing and describing the patterns and processes by which the thin, brittle layer of hard rock that we call the Earth's crust, breaks up and deforms during mountain building events. Plate tectonics gives geologists a framework to interpret the various landscapes around the world, from volcanic mountain ranges such as the Andes, to ancient continental collision mountain ranges such as the Appalachians. My study focuses on the mountains of the desert southwestern U.S., referred to generally as the Basin and Range, and the result of crustal deformation due to the extension of the brittle crust. The broad questions I am asking are: how does the brittle crust break (in faults) when it is pulled apart in extension? How much extension can the brittle crust accomodate in normal faulting? What happens to extensional faults at great depth in the crust, where the hard, brittle rock becomes hot and ductile? I am mapping rocks in the Tule Springs Hills of Nevada with the goal of answering some of these questions and finding basic constraints on other questions.

LEEFS Motivation
My interest in LEEFS comes from a lot of public education in my own background, and a firm belief that good public education is an essential piece of a society that makes the kind of lofty claims that ours does; equal rights for all, life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, the right to self-determination, the ideal of each person being able to make a life of their own choosing. While most of these lofty ideals are realities for only the wealthy members of our society, public education is a common ground for all of us and something that every community in America can claim as their own. I hope that through LEEFS I will be able to integrate myself into a public school community and build relationships with teachers, students, and administrators, which will strengthen the educational experience in that community and also broaden my own perspective on the world.

Collaboration Description
I will work with Ms. Adams to enrich the science curriculum in her classes, especially in areas of my own expertise (mainly geology: rocks), and help run successful laboratory experiences for the entire class by providing extra one-on-one attention where needed.


Contact:
johnt@ldeo.columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Earth and Environmental Science

Collaboration:
2010-2011: Samantha Adams
The Heritage School

Debra Tillinger

Research
I study the Indonesian Throughflow, which is the transport of water from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean. If you imagine all of ocean circulation as a big conveyor belt, this is the return flow. The Indonesian Throughflow is challenging to study because the water flows through a complex network of narrow straits in an area dominated by a monsoon climate and the effects of El Niño. My work takes the small amount of observational data that are available and extends them in time so that a more nuanced understanding of the variability of the Indonesian Throughflow can be gained.

LEEFS Motivation
I wanted to spend some time away from my computer and interacting with the real world. Working at DLMS gives me the perspective to appreciate what I do and the ability to share it with my students.

Collaboration Description
I work closely with Annie Blomberg and Lauren Brooks at DLMS to keep the science curriculum focused on experimentation and scientific inquiry. At DLMS, I assist in teaching science classes and work with students in small groups or one-on-one to deepen their understanding of the material and to encourage their questions. I also help plan and run the after-school science clubs. While at sea, I blog at http://mstsea.blogspot.com/ so that I can stay in touch with my students and include them in active research.


Contact:
debrat@ldeo.columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Earth and Environmental Science

Collaboration:
2008-2010: Annie Blomberg
2008-2010: Lauren Brooks
2008-2009: Caitlin Caldwell
Dual Language Middle School

Links:
Research Group Website
Ms. T at Sea (blog)

Christine Vanos

Research
I work in an organic methods development lab. Currently, we are investigating the utility of aromatic ions as catalysts for a number of chemical transformations. I specifically am investigating cyclopropenium mediated Beckmann Rearrangements, and the catalytic conversion of of aromatic ion-activated alcohols to alkyl chlorides. In a larger sense, we develop new methods for existing chemical reactions, with the aims of reducing the number of steps or byproducts, and/or increasing overall efficiency and yields for reactions.

LEEFS Motivation
Chemistry has always been my favorite subject, mainly because I had a great chemistry teacher in high school. I hope to show students that science is fun and interesting, and they can make a career out of it. And as much as I love my research, I look forward to stepping away from my fume hood one day a week to see and share science in a more general and accessible context.

Collaboration Description
Coming Soon!


Contact:
cmv2114@columbia.edu

Columbia University:
Department of Chemistry

Collaboration:
2010-2011: Cristi Lagos
Middle School 88, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NY